• I love archaeology. If you do too, add your news here.


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    The antecedents of Western Portraiture
    Wooden portraits found in Egyptian tomb prove to be oldest in world


    ... this new type of research may shed light on where the techniques used in the Byzantine Empire came from. He added that the Roman-Egyptian portraits had been created in Egypt from the 1st and 3rd centuries AD. For example, the Egyptian artists’ techniques were actually used by Greek artists, who ended up creating the head-on portraits. Those techniques would go on to inspire the iconic images of Jesus Christ, the Virgin Mary, and angels in the Orthodox Christian and Catholic Churches.


    Link


    Artists were making complex portraits on Wood from various materials traded all over the ancient world. These portraits in the article are the oldest of this kind yet discovered. Humans have always loved creative representations and the making of art and icons, images, statuary, and artefacts of the most exquisite workmanship go a long way to rescuing humanity from some of its more spectacular failures. :)

  • Discovery in Denmark of grave of powerful Viking lord.


    (Excuse the bit about "evidence for immigration into Denmark and "early globalisation." Just getting their ideological oar in and talking rubbish again. A woman's bones from Jutland show she was born in Norway. Oooh, multicultiralism! Ahhhh! globalisation! It's very annoying and utterly infantile, but I have come to expect this endless insertion of their belief system into every nook and cranny. If they can't find a nook or a cranny, they break one open with statements of unmitigated bollocks. Best not to get angry and just ignore these things.)


    What is really stunning is the grave of this man and the quality of his gold bridle artefacts.


    link


    He has his own web site


    http://www.vikingfregerslev.dk/

  • Great topic LW and interesting news items to start it off!


    Didn't those chaps have large eyes on those portraits? I wonder if all the ancient Egyptians looked like that, quite a bit different to modern Egyptians, or, if they were Romans instead.


    What is really stunning is the grave of this man and the quality of his gold bridle artefacts.

    He was clearly either a King of that time or a senior lord to have such a possession made for a horse!

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  • The portraits from the Egyptian dig are almost certainly Mediterranean folk, Romans and/or Greek. The Egyptians from the Pharaonic Period dating "from the 32nd century BC, when Upper and Lower Egypt were unified, until the country fell under Macedonian rule, in 332 BC" (Wikipedia), will have looked different as the Egyptians had a different style. They did get a little frivolous during the New Kingdom but are known essentially for their unique form of stylisation. What is interesting regarding these portraits is the nature of trade in the ancient world. It was wide and diverse.


    The Viking lord's grave is, I agree, one of an important figure. That kind of decoration is like the sort seen in Anglo-Saxon grave digs like the treasures of the Sutton Hoo. Dr Sam Newton has a lovely site on the Wuffings which I have visited for years and years. :)


    link

  • 2,500 year old Greek city uncovered



    link


    It is often something of a miracle that things like this survive the turmoil of history, but here is one and it gives a window on what life was like in a once prosperous Greek town in ancient Italy.

  • ...It's hard to get your head around that this place existed over 2,500 years ago and in such a stunning setting too.


    Never heard of the Lucanians. I wonder how many other ancient people's have yet to be rediscovered?

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  • So many have vanished, H. The Etruscans, the Thracians, Cloud Warriors of Peru, indigenous people of Hong Kong island ... gone. Amazing cultures and civilizations turned to ruins and buried under the detritus of history. When these are rediscovered, their beauty and workmanship make us gaze in shocked wonder at what they were producing so long ago.


    Archaeology is both sad and entrancing. It's the story of humanity. It is being systematically ground to dust in Palmyra as we speak. They have crushed world heritage art and architecture into splinters through violent, ignorant, brutish disdain. It's terrible to see what is emerging now as IS is driven back. :(

  • Nothing new though in artefacts, books, paintings etc being destroyed by thugs.


    Their common trait seems to be, if you cannot make something, destroy it instead. At their core, they're thick idiots jealous of others, even others who lived thousands of years ago.


    The destruction of those gigantic Buddha statues in Afghanistan is probably the worst example of this to date.

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  • In ancient Persia, engineers mastered a sustainable technology to store ice throughout the scorching summer.

    In the hot, dry deserts of Ancient Persia in around 400 B.C.E, long before the invention of electricity, engineers mastered a sustainable technology to store ice throughout the scorching summer.


    link

  • Humans have this disturbing combination of intelligence and stupidity, rational and irrational that makes us so dangerous, both to ourselves and to the environment and all our fellow travellers. We are amazingly ingenious and disappointingly obsessive and superstitious. We invent philosophies of liberty as well as ideologies of oppression. What is wrong with us? :D

  • From Vilified to Vindicated: the Story of Jacques Cinq-Mars


    This is an article about what happened to an archaeologist who dared to question the "Clovis First" theory of migrations to North America. The ridicule and contempt he had to deal with nearly broke him as a researcher. The brainwashed acolytes of the extant theory made his work almost impossible. But the Bluefish Caves evidence he found has finally put an old theory to bed and the man who didn't give up and dated his finds to 24,000 years BC has been vindicated


    The article is interesting also for its caveat on the way in which smugness can creep into even the most rigorous of scientific communities and make of them hostile warrior bands against anything, and anyone, that doesn't fit in.


    link

  • They don't like it uppem and in politics that takes a long time to work round as evidence isn't nice and obvious as it is in science, or even in law. In politics you have ideology. Like religion - bummer :(

  • From Vilified to Vindicated: the Story of Jacques Cinq-Mars


    This is an article about what happened to an archaeologist who dared to question the "Clovis First" theory of migrations to North America. The ridicule and contempt he had to deal with nearly broke him as a researcher. The brainwashed acolytes of the extant theory made his work almost impossible. But the Bluefish Caves evidence he found has finally put an old theory to bed and the man who didn't give up and dated his finds to 24,000 years BC has been vindicated


    The article is interesting also for its caveat on the way in which smugness can creep into even the most rigorous of scientific communities and make of them hostile warrior bands against anything, and anyone, that doesn't fit in.


    Scientists can be territorial like anyone else, especially if "their" science relies on grants.


    Didn't Einstein have the same sort of issues too? Or am I thinking of someone else around that time?

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  • They don't like it uppem and in politics that takes a long time to work round as evidence isn't nice and obvious as it is in science, or even in law. In politics you have ideology. Like religion - bummer :(


    Hmm, I kinda agree.


    Science and politics can start with an idea rather ideology and its turning those ideas into practice is what's it's all about.

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  • There is a bit of a thing about the Native Americans and when they arrived. Ideologically left leaning types (which are the establishment voices and minds) tend to have hysterics if anyone suggests that the treasured ideas of who did what, where and when are disrupted by maverick investigation into their terrain.


    There have been enormous posturings over Caucasian looking ancient remains discovered in America from ancient times and there was quite a lot of nasty spitting about the fact that Columbus did not "discover" America and that the Vikings did. It is now accepted that the Vikings did. Of course, they only discovered America for Europeans, as America was already known to a great many native peoples already living there. ;)


    But one or two mummified by nature remains that looked European created a stir. Thou shalt not, etc. The Native Americans are very selfish about allowing anyone to see the remains or examine them as they don't wish to lose any of their hard won rights to indigenous status. This can retard archaeology quite severely, which is a pity as scientists just want to know what is going on and what went on and aren't interested in political wrangling about who's the undisputed regent of any modern manifestation of any ancient space.

  • Huge Roundhead civil war battle flag will go on display for first time in 350 years.


    An extremely rare 25 foot square Parliamentarian battle flag from the English Civil War will go on display for the first time


    For the first time in 350 years, a symbol of armed resistance to the Crown is to be put on public display in a government funded institution – though more in the cause of historical education than subversion.


    The symbol – an ultra-rare 25 square foot Parliamentarian battle flag – will go on public display for the first time since the English Civil War, when the National Army Museum reopens next week after three years of refurbishment work.


    Of the hundreds of civil war Parliamentarian flags that were made and carried on campaign, only around half a dozen have survived – mainly in private collections.


    But the one going on permanent public display next week has a particularly remarkable history.


    Read more ...

  • Quote

    Iron Age chariot and horse found buried together in Yorkshire


    The Ancient Brits loved their wheels. Indeed they seem to have been so attached to their sports-car-style chariots that they may even have thought they could use them to get to the next world.


    Academic knowledge about these elegant high status prehistoric British vehicles is now set to increase significantly, following the discovery of an ancient Briton buried inside his chariot in East Yorkshire.


    link

  • New dates for Southern African rock art define the culture and meanings of the stone age hunter-gatherer San people and the depictions of the shaman's journeys to the spirit world and what was seen there. These visions are translated into the rock art and accurate dating can now place them in a time frame and an assessment can be made with the cultural significance of these to other tribes and to the stone age world view in general. These are very beautiful, lyrical paintings and often very realistic even though also exhibiting stylisation. The colouring, shading and empathic representations are all part of the way the people of that time saw both the life-world and the world of "the spirits".


    Earliest dated rock art in Southern Africa depicts shamans' journey to the world of the spirits


    For years, archaeologists have known that southern Africa is home to very rich and well-understood rock art produced by hunter-gatherers in the Later Stone Age, but they had been unable to date these creations precisely.


    Using an innovative approach, researchers have now come up with new dates, which suggest that in south-eastern Botswana, rock art was created as far back as 5723–4420 cal BP – the oldest such evidence found to date in Southern Africa. Their complete findings are now published in the Journal Antiquity.


    link

  • Queen Cartimundua, the opposite of Queen Boudicca:


    New light shed on Royal sex scandal as ancient Roman remains unearthed


    In the settlement – located at Scotch Corner, 40 miles north of York – the archaeological excavations have unearthed what may well be the first archaeological evidence of Cartimandua’s deep collaboration with the Romans and her betrayal of native Britain.


    link

  • Queen Cartimundua, the opposite of Queen Boudicca:


    I wish I had the mental capacities to be good at science, because as science as shown, when the knowledge changes, so does the theory.


    I was taught at school that the Romans invaded Britain. Full stop. Then we learnt about 10-20 years ago that at least one British lord was doing deals with the Romans and "invited" them to come, they probably were going to come anyway, but he thought it wise to get ahead of things. Quite rightly so! And since then more discoveries keep coming.


    Now we have evidence of more wheeling and dealing with the Romans which just further proves the point that the "facts" I learnt about the Roman invasion, are nothing of the sort. The invasion was not as clear cut as originally thought and taught. Many Britons were pro-Roman and actively supported them.

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  • Same with the Anglo-Saxons. We don't get the full story there either. And the Vikings have undergone such a trashing that they are not comprehended either. maybe in the future, when less ideological pushers are around in academia, someone may decide to tell the truth.

  • Although some academics may skew things to fit their "picture" especially if funding is at stake, I don't think it is widespread, at least in this case. It's simply a case of as we aquire greater knowledge of something, then the "picture" changes.

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  • You'd be amazed at how good they are when in the pockets of the ruling elite, to promote its ideology or suppress the truth, if they want to keep their jobs. Or get jobs in that capacity in the first place. The ordinary citizen has been lied to for many centuries by a flotilla of dreadful gunboats of the State or the Church. A fear of authority has mostly kept the people quiet, coupled with a fear of God, of shunning and of that little note that tells you you will never eat lunch in town again and your family will starve. This has kept people good and sweet for so long, no one questions what they are told any more.


    It's why fake news works so well. It's from a news site, or Facebook, the Dear Leader, Fuhrer, Pope, Prime Minister, President or King said it, therefore it must be true. Stop eating bananas today, start eating them tomorrow, don't do this, do that, fear this, hate that, love the next thing or you will die ... All little exercises in ascertaining just how gullible and malleable people are and how easy it is to separate them from their common sense and their ability to say, "No thanks."


    It's easier than anyone thinks. Marxists used the clever method of telling people who the enemy was, why they were suffering and what to do about it. It's the same method religious authority uses. Tell people a lie, embroider it with authority, sanctioned by some institution (Church, State, Academia, etc) with enough clout to make it seem good and true and you have millions eating out of your hand.


    We really do deserve everything we get. We pillory the boy who says the emperor is naked and we ignore the boy who finds the leak in the dyke. I often wonder whether their courage and honour are worth it. Humans are such a disappointing species en mass. It's in their individual capacity that they tend to shine. And a lot depends on whether anyone is going to step out of the box and give an alternative opinion any credit. Often, humanity en mass, egged on by those who are punting the mirage, is too busy fetching a rope to lynch the boy who said the emperor was naked.


    This opinion won't sit well with some, but it sits very well with me, from personal experience as well as observation. :cool:

  • Lost Saxon king's remains may be under tennis court


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    St Edmund was a Saxon king who ruled in the ninth century. As a saint, his remains were kept in a shrine in Bury St Edmunds.


    At the time of the desecration of the Benedictine Abbey, during Henry VIII's reign, the remains were lost.


    But historians believe the remains may well be below the tennis courts in Abbey Gardens, which sit on top of a former monks' graveyard in the sedate East Anglian town.


    link

  • Huge Celtic Iron Age tomb with stunning artifacts discovered in France

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    There’s a massive funerary chamber in France where Archaeologists are doing a research for what they believe was a 5th century BC Celtic Prince holding his chariot, a bronze made cauldron, a vase with a Greek god of wine and ecstasy painted on it, a huge knife and few other artifacts.


    link

  • Mystery messages engraved into Scotland’s rocks up to 5,000 years ago might soon be unveiled using 3D scans

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    Although their meaning has been lost to history, distinctive marks on Scottish rocks from ancient peoples provide a link to our past.


    Recently, a new project has launched an attempt to finally solve the mysteries of prehistoric stone carvings. Using 3D scanning to record and examine more than 2,000 carvings around the country, specialists are creating a new digital database of the mysterious etchings.


    link

  • Oldest evidence of life on land found in 3.48-billion-year-old Australian rocks

    This is actually astrobiology and interesting vis a vis the origins of life on earth from water theory. Some think life may have originated on earth in terrestrial hot springs.


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    Fossil evidence of early life has been discovered by UNSW scientists in 3.48 billion year old hot spring deposits in the Pilbara of Western Australia - pushing back by 3 billion years the earliest known existence of inhabited terrestrial hot springs on Earth.

    Previously, the world's oldest evidence for microbial life on land came from 2.7- 2.9 billion year old deposits in South Africa containing organic matter-rich ancient soils.


    Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-05-…r-old-australian.html#jCp

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