• At least we got rid of fox hunting, FIdget. Just a bloodsport for the toffs.


    I have found that if people have no care or compassion for animals, that's carries over in how they view and treat people too.


    The only things I kill are mosquitos and that was only after I was bitten a dozen times while doing my garden yesterday.

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  • Having had horses, I got to know people who went fox hunting. They cared nothing for their horses and most of their horses were so big, beautiful and brave. They were just a means of transport to the hunters. I had to beg one lady not to shoot a horse because it needed a few months field rest after an injury. I would have taken it, if she had let me, but she did keep it in the end as I saw it in her fields. I don't know whether it was ever used for hunting again.


    I once went on a sponsored ride for charity, organised by a hunt. Never again. They went at full pelt and were even cantering on the roads, and the little children on the ponies were having to gallop to keep up. It knackers the horses legs going at speed on a hard road. I had a thoroughbred, and she was all fired up due to the speed and I had one hell of a job controlling her. She came through without injury, fortunately.

  • I've got a couple of fox hunting tales to tell as well, but perhaps better for the royal thread, as one person involved was Phil-the-tosser.

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  • One in Five UK Mammals faces extinction.

    The red squirrel, the wildcat, and the grey long-eared bat are all facing severe threats to their survival, according to new research.

    They are among 12 species that have been put on the first "red list" for wild mammals in the UK.

    If we keep destroying the habitat of the wildlife, we'll destroy ourselves too.


    I don't know about anyone else, but along with the red squirrel which I've already mentioned, I've never seen a water vole, pine martin, polecat, badger, the bats mentioned in the article or wildcat.

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  • If we keep destroying the habitat of the wildlife, we'll destroy ourselves too.

    Blame the ever increasing human population. We live in a consumer society, where business needs more and more consumers, and our pension and other ponzi/pyramid schemes need more and more 'new' entrants to provide for the previous level.


    Green belt isn't sacrosant these days, and is used for housing. Locally, farmland is disappearing and they are building housing on flood plains and steep hilly areas. One particularly new large housing area on a steep hill leads down to a busy main road. That will be 'fun' when it's icy!


    I am glad I won't be around to see the total destruction of green areas and wildlife habitat.

  • I've seen several badgers but not the others. The real issue is the massive overpopulation of the planet. Currently we are exploiting 3 times the resources that the Earth can sustain. That cannot continue so either everybody has to live much more frugally in terms of resource use or we have to have fewer children in a dramatic way.


    I see no evidence that people will do either unless forced to.:(

    History is much like an Endless Waltz. The three beats of war, peace and revolution continue on forever.

    4312-gwban-gif

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  • Where have you seen the badgers Heero? Never reckoned them to be coastal creatures.


    The Green Belt around London is slowly getting obliterated despite the so called rules not to build on. Strange how these absolute rules, are not so absolute when it suits certain interests.


    The farmland is an interesting one, because the farmers themselves are helping to destroy it. First they built all their ugly corrugated sheds up and down the land, and then they expanded their properties and more recent decades, we have the holiday lets taking up yet more space.


    Fidget, I don't think we'll have total destruction of the habitat in our country, but around the big cities and towns, it will be a problem.


    Heero, on your comments, we still have a whole continent, Africa, that is barely started to develop. Some estimates will be that their population will increase by two to three billion over the next fifty years. That will put a massive strain on the environment.

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  • Where have you seen the badgers Heero? Never reckoned them to be coastal creatures.

    In my mothers garden down in Cornwall. They used to come over the stone wall and dig holes in the lawn. We also had rabbits and phesants regularly visiting as well as a sparrow hawk.



    we still have a whole continent, Africa, that is barely started to develop.

    I saw an estimate that if everybody on the planet now wanted to live at the minimum we in this country consider the boundary of "poverty" (2/3 average wage ~ £18k) you would need the resources of 6 Earths and that's before the population rises to the estimated 10 billion around the middle of this century.


    Totally unsustainable so unless something dramatic happens like a world war or plague pandemic, the destructuon can only get worse and sooner or later nature will have its revenge.

    History is much like an Endless Waltz. The three beats of war, peace and revolution continue on forever.

    4312-gwban-gif

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  • Totally unsustainable so unless something dramatic happens like a world war or plague pandemic, the destructuon can only get worse and sooner or later nature will have its revenge.

    Agreed. Nature has a way of tacking overpopulation, and it's called starvation and disease ... or possibly war, which will become more likely as the human population increases and nobody has the means to support them, but they are overrun by migrants seeking survival anyway. The costs of artificially maintaining food production and disease prevention are exhorbitant and can be more damaging, and there is no way scientific advances can be used for every human on this planet. It will come down to the wealthy will survive, initially, but the poorer people that they rely on for their own survival won't be there any longer.


    The human population has to be severely restricted if this planet (and the creatures that live on it) is to survive.

  • ....:/ And how exactly would you go about that? China tried it and some people still found ways around it.


    I'm kind of hoping, Putin and the Chinese leader aside, there won't be another major world war again, but while those megalomanias run countries, who knows. As for disease, I'm sure science will solve that one eventually.


    As I've said before, I'm a great sci-fi fan and one of the common themes for the future is low resources and a struggling population where the wealthy, as is always the case, are the winners. I hope humanity can come up with something better than that.

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  • .... :/ And how exactly would you go about that? China tried it and some people still found ways around it.

    I have maybe got the wrong end of the stick, but I thought the one child policy raised two problems.


    1. Female offspring were aborted, as it was advantageous to have a male child.

    2. The population fell too far, and the people needed to support the aging population was insufficient.


    China hasn't completely abandoned population control, and as far as I am aware, they have relaxed the restrictions and many can now have a second child, but this will still result in a declining population.

  • Your dead on Fidget.:thumbup: What I meant was, is that the Chinese people sometimes had two or more children, especially where they could get away with it in remote areas.


    As you say, the Chinese are now having population problems due to their policies. The Japanese are also having population problems, although for a different reason.

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  • Japan whale hunting: Commercial whaling to restart in July

    Japan says it is to restart commercial whaling in July in a move that is likely to draw international criticism.

    It said it would withdraw from the International Whaling Commission (IWC), the body tasked with whale conservation.

    Commercial whaling was banned by the IWC in 1986 after some species were driven almost to extinction.

    A major step back this.:cursing:


    As the article goes on to say, the Japanese have weaned themselves off whale meat now, which used to be one of their primary meat sources, so why start it again?


    I know they see whales as fish and just as meat and perhaps they have a point in some ways, we kills various animals for food too, but we specifically breed those animals for that purpose, whales are wild, mammals and very intelligent.


    Greenpeace do your stuff.:evil:

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  • I hope Japan is 'persuaded' to stop, somehow, and I don't particularly care how, so long as they are stopped. Nobody has discovered a humane way to dispatch whales. All current methods are extremely cruel. I loathe the Faroe Islanders for the same reason. Their method of dispatching pilot whales is horrific.


    I too, hope that Greenpeace foul up their whale hunts.

  • Nationalism is rising in Japan stoked by tensions with China and so I don't think Fidget, that the Japanese will stop. They see this as a "cultural" issue.

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  • Elephants have EVOLVED to not grow tusks in Mozambique national park where nearly 90% were slaughtered for ivory to fund 16-year civil war

    African elephants that survived intense ivory hunting are evolving to not grow tusks as to protect them from poaching.

    Almost 90 per cent of the elephants in Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park were slaughtered for their ivory to finance weapons in the country's 16-year civil war.

    But around a third of females - the generation born after the war ended in 1992 - have not developed tusks.

    Interesting story this, despite the Mail's misleading headline.


    This has nothing to do with elephants evolving, but natural selection. Female elephants who had no tusks or only small tusks, who survived the civil war, have passed down these genes onto to their daughters. That is not a change in genes, evolving, but interesting none the less.


    The story goes on to say that human action on the elephants is having widespread consequences. Firstly, the elephants that survived the slaughter are now intolerant to humans which is hardly surprising considering what people have done to them.


    Secondly, the feeding habits of the elephants is changing, because the elephants with smaller tusks or no tusks at all, are unable to dig for water or use the tusks against trees to get bark off them for food. As a consequence, the elephants are moving into different areas which is affecting other animals and impacting the whole eco system.


    I try not to swear most times, but people can be utter cunts in how they behave not just to each other, but how we treat animals too.:(

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  • Botswana mulls lifting elephant hunting ban

    A report by cabinet ministers in Botswana has recommended lifting a four-year hunting ban and the introduction of elephant culling.

    After months of public meetings and consultations, the report by ministers also recommends the "establishment of elephant meat canning" for pet food.

    Another elephant story and not a pleasant one either.X(:(


    It is obscene to want to lift a hunting ban on elephants for the primary reason so that their meat can be used as pet food. What are they thinking?


    If we destroy all the world's creatures and their environments, we destroy ourselves too.

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  • Quote

    Human activity has killed off 680 mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, and fish species since the 1500s. As much as half of the total number of animal individuals that once shared the planet with us are already gone.


    Frogs dying off at record rates


    :cursing:

    There, in a mauve light of drifted lupins,

    They hung in the cupped hands of mountains

    Made of tingling atoms.- Ted Hughes


  • Plant extinction 'bad news for all species'

    Almost 600 plant species have been lost from the wild in the last 250 years, according to a comprehensive study.

    The number is based on actual extinctions rather than estimates, and is twice that of all bird, mammal and amphibian extinctions combined.

    Scientists say plant extinction is occurring up to 500 times faster than what would be expected naturally.

    In May, a UN report estimated that one million animal and plant species were threatened with extinction.

    More evidence of the madness.:(


    As the article goes on to say, most people could not name one plant species that has gone extinct, I know I couldn't. Can you?

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  • D.H. Lawrence got so frustrated with our destructiveness he once wrote Imagine a world without humans, just acres of grass and a hare sitting up.

    There, in a mauve light of drifted lupins,

    They hung in the cupped hands of mountains

    Made of tingling atoms.- Ted Hughes


  • At least all the creatures would have a good chance of survival without humans in it, as things stand, we're on course to destroy this world and everything in it.

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  • The Great Green Wall of the Sahara


    Quote

    The Great Green Wall, or Great Green Wall of the Sahara and the Sahel (French: Grande Muraille Verte pour le Sahara et le Sahel), is Africa's flagship initiative to combat the effects of climatic change and desertification. Led by the African Union, the initiative aims to transform the lives of millions of people by creating a mosaic of green and productive landscapes across North Africa.


    From the initial idea of a line of trees from east to west bordering the African desert, the vision of a Great Green Wall has evolved into that of a mosaic of interventions addressing the challenges facing the people in the Sahel and the Sahara. As a programming tool for rural development, the overall goal of this partnership is to strengthen regional resilience and natural systems with sound ecosystem management, protection of rural heritage, and improved living conditions.


    The project is a response to the combined effect of natural resources degradation and drought in rural areas. It is a partnership that supports communities working towards sustainable management and use of forests, rangelands and other natural resources. It seeks to help communities mitigate and adapt to climate change, as well as improve food security.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall

    There, in a mauve light of drifted lupins,

    They hung in the cupped hands of mountains

    Made of tingling atoms.- Ted Hughes


  • The Great Green Wall of the Sahara

    Fascinating, LW. Never heard of it. This from the end of the article:


    This is superb.


    Playing devil's advocate here, but I know desertification has been sped up by man's activities and especially global warming, but ultimately desertification is a natural process, so will this process be able to stop it? Should it even??

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  • Runner ducks used on wine farm to control insect pests.


    https://youtu.be/2p0xmfx-JHw

    I have never seen ducks "shepherded" like that before, fascinating and funny.:)


    Could this be the answer to pesticide use? And if not ducks, then something else, as long as the creatures are small.

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  • Re the forestation of the Sahara tree belt. I saw an article somewhere last week but can't remember where, that greening the desert is a big thing for the future and desalination will help with this. It could help to change those areas back to green and viable. They weren't always deserts, so here's hoping.


    Re the running ducks. This can be very effective. I have hadeda ibis and thrushes, among others, that go on bug duty and clean up the grass and flower beds of insects. At night the bush babies and bats go into action. Also lots of lizards and spiders that eat the very mall insects. Finches gobble plant lice and scale. Toads at night eat slugs. It's war out there where no one is looking. The birds service my plant pots as well.

    There, in a mauve light of drifted lupins,

    They hung in the cupped hands of mountains

    Made of tingling atoms.- Ted Hughes


  • Re the running ducks. This can be very effective. I have hadeda ibis and thrushes, among others, that go on bug duty and clean up the grass and flower beds of insects. At night the bush babies and bats go into action. Also lots of lizards and spiders that eat the very mall insects. Finches gobble plant lice and scale. Toads at night eat slugs. It's war out there where no one is looking. The birds service my plant pots as well.

    I rewatched the video you linked to and right after that played, another vid popped up about ducks and the first thing that was mentioned was duck poo.


    Having been to lots of parks with ducks and all the mess they create, I'm not sure this is a good idea now. Do we really want all duck mess by our food?


    Re the forestation of the Sahara tree belt. I saw an article somewhere last week but can't remember where, that greening the desert is a big thing for the future and desalination will help with this. It could help to change those areas back to green and viable. They weren't always deserts, so here's hoping.

    I was very keen on reclaiming the deserts and appreciate you posting this, as I've never heard about this. But I think it was Fidget who said earlier in this thread, that deserts are a environment in their own right which contain unique lifeforms and need protecting, so I'm not sure now about greening over them.


    If some areas having recently become desert, then fine, I've no problem in humans taking these areas back, but if areas have been desert for thousands of years, I'm not so sure.

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  • Human populations are driving this so it will happen out of necessity. Or those multitudes will be forced to leave their deserts and look for "a better life" somewhere else.


    As for duck poo, it's all free organic fertilizer.


    Food should all be thoroughly washed before eating. Because people just shake it out of a plastic packet and consume it today many get sick.


    Many changes will come about in the future on account of expanding human populations. It's very depressing but unless education about family planning is instituted and religious authority on these matters is downgraded, humanity will eat the planet and thereafter fight until balance is achieved but to the detriment of many ecosystems and biodiversity. The dinosaurs had an asteroid, we have the human population bomb.


    Few are willing to look at this problem because there is a fashionable "humanism" ideology prevailing where humans take precedence over everything and the green attitudes shoved in there are mostly not green but socialist and geared toward humanity. They are in love with their own species, and consequently with themselves, but deeply detest certain elements who dissent against this madness.


    :S

    There, in a mauve light of drifted lupins,

    They hung in the cupped hands of mountains

    Made of tingling atoms.- Ted Hughes


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