Old black & white English films.

Please treat other members in a constructive manner and abide by our Forum Rules at all times.
  • Yes indeed Harry Andrews, good example. I seem to remember him in a film when he played a sadistic MP in a military nick in the desert somewhere. A 1960's film I would have thought.

    Of the people you mention, who are without question stars in their own right, I think I like Jack Hawkins the best, the others were excellent actors but too Hollywood for me.

    Whenever I think of Michael Hordern I'm immediately reminded of Scrooge, great film.

  • Yes 'Ice Cold in Alex' is a John Mills classic. Digressing slightly, well rather a lot actually, John Mills or 'Sir' John Mills said he put his virility down to keeping his testicles cold by taking cold baths! Make of that what you will. Just thought I'd mention it lol.

    There were loads of actors around in those days that we always saw in films but never knew their names, they never really made it to the top but were always in the background. I suppose the best example of an actor we all know but never quite made it is Sam Kydd. But people like David Lodge and Sidney Tafler were in dozens of films and I suspect most people of a certain age would recognise their faces, but struggle to name them.

    I would need to look them up as I don't recognise the names, although I've forgotten about most of the big name stars of that era too, now.

  • Yes indeed Harry Andrews, good example. I seem to remember him in a film when he played a sadistic MP in a military nick in the desert somewhere. A 1960's film I would have thought.

    Of the people you mention, who are without question stars in their own right, I think I like Jack Hawkins the best, the others were excellent actors but too Hollywood for me.

    Whenever I think of Michael Hordern I'm immediately reminded of Scrooge, great film.

    The film you refer to was called "The Hill" and starred Sean Connery. It was the film Connery was required to make for that studio (can't remember which studio it was) in order to fulfil his contract to them even though by that time he'd signed up for more Bond films.

    It was while Connery was making The Hill that George Lazenby stood in as Bond for the making of On Her Majesty's Secret Service which also starred the delicious Diana Rigg and a very young Joanna Lumley.

    Harry Andrews though, was the real star of The Hill. Not so much a brutal and sadistic NCO, but rather one driven by the rule book.... adhered to its every word as if it was holy writ.

    The cast also included Ian Bannen, Roy Kinnear, Ian Hendry and the superb Ossie Davis who, hilariously, decided that he'd had enough of the army, stripped off his uniform and walked out in his boxers declaring that he wasn't going to play anymore.

    A very good film and a searing indictment of archaic army disciplinary methods.

  • Maybe it's me but I find all these old films so amateurish compared with modern stuff, the acting and the production

    Somebody recommended Talking Pictures TV which I saw included Expresso Bongo, a film I enjoyed in the day. What a load of tat, Laurence Harvey and actor????

    Showed how much films have improved, Those British actors withe clipped plummy voices

  • This will probably appeal to a niche audience, but I thought I'd mention it all the same. I have a penchant for old films, Ealing, Gainsborough that sot of thing. My small collection includes among others, a few Will Hay films of which 'Oh Mr Porter' 1937 is my fave, and several Alastair Sim classics, two of my faves being Scrooge 1951, and School for Scoundrels 1960. Many others but those spring to mind. I think I like these films so much because I'm a mug for nostalgia, I'd watch The Lavender Hill Mob over a Hollywood blockbuster any day.

    i also like those old films

  • I've a short list of favourite movies which are now rare/rarely screened/cancelled/impossible to find on DVD.. etc.

    One them is Frankie Howerd in The House in Nightmare Park. (no not B/W, maybe call the thread 'classic British films'?)

    It's by no means a great jewel of comedy thanks to a weak script, but it's classic thanks to it having Howerd playing a leading role in a comic/horror/mystery rather than a vehicle for his low-grade smut standup material. Up Pompeii movies are just TV spinoffs and he only did a few Carry On roles.

  • The Third Man is my favourite, I have watched it about 50 times. It is still regarded as the greatest film ever made by most polls/listings mainly because it is Black and White and the use of lighting.

    I Would Rather Be Hated For Telling The Truth Than Revered For Speaking A Lie.

Participate now!

Don’t have an account yet? Register yourself now and be a part of our community!