Old black & white English films.

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  • This will probably appeal to a niche audience, but I thought I'd mention it all the same. I have a penchant for old films, Ealing, Gainsborough that sot of thing. My small collection includes among others, a few Will Hay films of which 'Oh Mr Porter' 1937 is my fave, and several Alastair Sim classics, two of my faves being Scrooge 1951, and School for Scoundrels 1960. Many others but those spring to mind. I think I like these films so much because I'm a mug for nostalgia, I'd watch The Lavender Hill Mob over a Hollywood blockbuster any day.

  • I remember Ealing, but Gainsborough has me at a loss. What did they do?

    I liked Alastair Sim too. At some point I'd like to have the time and watch or rewatch the classics.

  • You must have seen this before -

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    - 'Oh Mr Porter' is a classic 1937 Gainsborough. 'Convict 99' from 1938 again with Will Hay. 'The Lady Vanishes' 1938 with Margaret Lockwood, to name just three. I believe Gainsborough studios were going until the 1950's but have long since been demolished, the houses that were built on the site are on Gainsborough Court.

  • No Sir, new to me, the intro anyway and I like things like that.

    Oh Mr Porter sounds familiar, but the others don't. I shall check them out at some point.

    Edit: we're going at doing costume dramas on tv, imagine if the shows had a intro like that. Would be great. And when we sell it to the yanks, they'd love it too.

  • I LOVE ST Trinians!:) There was a remake about ten-twenty years ago that was awful.

    We're good at comedy, why can't we make more stuff like that now?

    Yes the origional three St Trinian's films were great. The fourth in 1966 'The Great St Trinian's Train Robbery' was quite different and imo ruined by people like Reg Varney, Frankie Howard, Terry Scott and Arthur Mullard. This was the first St Trinians film the great Alastair Sim and Joyce Grenfell did not appear in, and that speaks volumes.

  • I liked Frankie Howard. It was Norman Wisdom that really got my goat. Just not funny. Joyce Grenfell's monologues were great and remember a very young George Cole as the spiv in St Trinians. Another name that was a regular: Julian Orchard. Had a cameo as the doctor in Up the Khyber.

  • I liked Frankie Howard. It was Norman Wisdom that really got my goat. Just not funny. Joyce Grenfell's monologues were great and remember a very young George Cole as the spiv in St Trinians. Another name that was a regular: Julian Orchard. Had a cameo as the doctor in Up the Khyber.

    I didn't mind Frankie Howard in his own right, his stage shows were good and I fondly remember 'Up Pompeii' but regarding the film in question, the 1966 'Great St Trinians Train Robbery' Frankie Howard considered himself the star of the film and behind the scenes acted like a spoiled prima donna, or so I've read. Also, and this is the reason it didn't feel like a St Trinians caper to me, no Alastair Sim or Joyce Grenfell.

  • We once had a spate of 1950s black and white working class films on TV. With Richard Attenborough in some of them. A time almost completely vanished in the mists of the modern mish mash.

  • We once had a spate of 1950s black and white working class films on TV. With Richard Attenborough in some of them. A time almost completely vanished in the mists of the modern mish mash.

    Ah yes now you're talking, Dickie Attenborough brilliant. Two films I watch from time to time are 'Brothers In Law' 1957 and 'London Belongs To Me' 1948. They are in a box set I have. I try not to watch them too often, but they are among my fave Dickie Attenborough films. I like his older stuff more than more modern films he did like Jurassic Park.

  • I liked Dickie too, sorely missed. At least his brother is still with us.

    Not a Norman Wisdom fan at all, but my dad loved him, which made things interesting in our household... He based his whole persona on Wisdom.:|

    Yes I know what you mean, some Norman Wisdom films were farcical & slapdash, it's almost as if the producers relied on the fact that Norman Wisdom would sell the film, and he did have a huge following in those days. I have about a dozen Norman Wisdom films and I cant name most of them, but there are one or two gems. 'On the Beat' and 'The early Bird' spring to mind both old favorites although I'm sure there are one or two more. I'm sure you're aware of this snippet, but he was a superstar in Albania of all places, lol.

  • Nope.:)

    One of the more modern comedians (name escapes me at the moment) bases his whole routine on Wisdom and I can't stand him either.

    I like slapstick humour, but I don't like stupidity and I guess there is a fine line between the two.

    Lee Evans?..

  • Lee Evans?..

    Yep. That's the plonker. Can't stand him


    One classic I downloaded a while ago was "Ice Cold in Alex" great film and some very young future stars. Anthony Quayle excels as a South African / German officer.

    I had to just look up and remind myself who Anthony Quayle was, but yes that was a actor I really liked and rated.

  • Yes 'Ice Cold in Alex' is a John Mills classic. Digressing slightly, well rather a lot actually, John Mills or 'Sir' John Mills said he put his virility down to keeping his testicles cold by taking cold baths! Make of that what you will. Just thought I'd mention it lol.

    There were loads of actors around in those days that we always saw in films but never knew their names, they never really made it to the top but were always in the background. I suppose the best example of an actor we all know but never quite made it is Sam Kydd. But people like David Lodge and Sidney Tafler were in dozens of films and I suspect most people of a certain age would recognise their faces, but struggle to name them.

  • most people of a certain age would recognise their faces, but struggle to name them.

    Harry Andrews was one of those actors that was in many films and so recognisable yet difficult to name.

    Likewise Michael Hordern.

    So many great names like James Mason, Richard Burton, Jack Hawkins and James Coburn.

    Many had Shakespearean background on stage.

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