Russian ex spies attacked on British streets

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    • Staff Notice

    All neatly tied up in a pink ribbon. But then with months or even years of work and prior preparation it was easy to craft a convincing, to some, narrative.


    As I said before, motive?


    For the Russians this would have been an obvious lose, lose operation. Especially using chemical weapons that the West was already foaming at the mouth over their supposed use in Syria.


    On the other hand, as an operation by MI5 to "get back" at the Russians after the West's arses were whipped in the Middle East, it's perfect.


    While Maybot was grandstanding all I could think was liar, liar pants on fire.


    Or maybe I read too any Craig Thomas novels.^^

  • The 'motive' is obvious, isn't it? Or maybe it's so obvious that people now think it is too obvious to be true? Russia punishes 'traitors' (always has), and they want to send out a message that they will be punished, no matter where they live. If this reputation is now being used for propaganda against Russia, then it is still well deserved. You have to already have a bad reputation for others to cash in on it.


    Do you really think Russia cares about all the 'liberal' reputation that the west seems so keen on? If we had the culprits in the UK there would be a load of luvvies declaring these men were 'forced' to do it, and therefore must be kept safe from Russian retaliation. Ironic, eh?

    Mark Twain — 'Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.'

  • The 'motive' is obvious, isn't it? Or maybe it's so obvious that people now think it is too obvious to be true? Russia punishes 'traitors' (always has), and they want to send out a message that they will be punished, no matter where they live. If this reputation is now being used for propaganda against Russia, then it is still well deserved. You have to already have a bad reputation for others to cash in on it.


    Do you really think Russia cares about all the 'liberal' reputation that the west seems so keen on? If we had the culprits in the UK there would be a load of luvvies declaring these men were 'forced' to do it, and therefore must be kept safe from Russian retaliation. Ironic, eh?

    If it was reversed the luvvies would be asking for immediate extradition to Russia and a full , very expensive , lawyers benefit, public enquiry to embarass ourselves but make them all feel more pious than ever .

  • The 'motive' is obvious, isn't it? Or maybe it's so obvious that people now think it is too obvious to be true? Russia punishes 'traitors' (always has), and they want to send out a message that they will be punished, no matter where they live. If this reputation is now being used for propaganda against Russia, then it is still well deserved. You have to already have a bad reputation for others to cash in on it.


    Do you really think Russia cares about all the 'liberal' reputation that the west seems so keen on? If we had the culprits in the UK there would be a load of luvvies declaring these men were 'forced' to do it, and therefore must be kept safe from Russian retaliation. Ironic, eh?

    I thought it was funny that the news reporting were saying that our Government were complaining that Russia's killing of traitors on British soil was handled incompetently. As we're a service economy, might we offer to Russia training sessions on how to kill naughty Russians on foreign soil with more greater care and efficiency? As they say in show biz, "it's a gas!"

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    I thought it was funny that the news reporting were saying that our Government were complaining that Russia's killing of traitors on British soil was handled incompetently. As we're a service economy, might we offer to Russia training sessions on how to kill naughty Russians on foreign soil with more greater care and efficiency? As they say in show biz, "it's a gas!"

    I don't think the lady who died or the people of Salisbury who've been affected by this would share your humour there.


    I saw the full speeches by all the ambassadors and I liked how ambassador mocked their asassin's professionalism. These are meant to be the cream of the crop, yet they wern't bothered if they would be identified or not, unless that was the idea.

    • Staff Notice

    For reference and context, here's the story about what happened at the UN yesterday:


    The US, France, Germany and Canada have agreed with the UK that the Russian government "almost certainly" approved the poisoning of ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in Salisbury.

    They have urged Russia to provide full disclosure of its Novichok programme.

    At a UN Security Council meeting to discuss the attack, Russia dismissed evidence presented by the UK as "lies".

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    Another about face from Putin.


    Last week he said the men weren't Russians, or couldn't prove to be Russians, but now he supposedly knows all about them. Hardly a surprise as they work for him...X/

    • Staff Notice

    Two men named as suspects in poisoning of Russian ex-spy claim they were merely tourists to Salisbury Cathedral.


    The men, named as Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov, told the RT channel that they saw the cathedral, before returning to London by train.

    They are accused by the UK of trying to kill Russian ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.

    The rats come out of their hole....


    So, the "tourists" just happened to have contaminated their hotel room with a nerve agent then?? Bollocks.

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    Good writers always make it so.;)


    Take a look:


    An investigative journalism website has published what it says is the real identity of one of the Russian intelligence officers suspected of the Salisbury nerve agent poisoning.


    The Bellingcat group claims the man who was named as Ruslan Boshirov is actually Colonel Anatoliy Chepiga.

    British officials have not commented. The BBC understands there is no dispute over the identification.

    What do you think now Heero?


    One of the "tourists" is a Russian soldier who has served in Chechnya, no doubt killing loads of people there too.

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    Ok. Fair enough. Personally, I think the evidence against the Russians is overwhelming.


    I wish Trump hadn't stated with this fake news rubbish, as its making many people distrust the reputable news sources that we all rely on.

    • Staff Notice

    Four Russians, a car full of electronic equipment, and a foiled plot to hack the world's foremost chemical weapons watchdog.

    The Dutch security services say Russia planned a cyber-attack on the Organisation for the Prevention of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in The Hague earlier this year.

    Before we get on today's story, here's a related one from last week about Russia's continued aggressive actions against the West. Both us, the Dutch and the Americans all held press conferences detailing Russia's spying and hacking activities.


    It's hardly a surprise the Russians went after the chemical weapons watchdog considering what they are doing in Syria and here.

    The name of the second suspect in the Salisbury case is actually Alexander Mishkin, the BBC understands.

    The Bellingcat investigative website says the man who travelled under the alias Alexander Petrov is in reality a military doctor working for Russian intelligence, the GRU.

    Now, today's story and the Russians have backed themselves into a corner here. We know the attacker's real names and positions now, no more lies from Putin, although I am sure he will continue to deny.


    What do we do about this?

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    Curious. I'll try and find that, if its on catch up or somewhere.


    Many on the hard left have always been associated with the Russians, so its not really a surprise. Scargill and Benn, to name a few obvious ones from the past.

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