Union boss threatens to bring Britain ‘to its knees’ and lead ‘millions’ on strike

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  • Those that work for the Crown are classed as Civil Servants , yes many of them will only work 9 to 5 but many other Public Servants work around the clock and many on unsocial hours, some will be paid more than others the higher you climb up the greasy poll the more you earn.

    They like anyone in work pay income tax NI towards the State Pension they also pay in a Pension fund , depending how much they pay in and for how long depends how much they get after 30 odd years or more.

    I worked in the Public Section since the early 70's wages back then were not good better now, I must have missed the amazing holidays and endless sick pay.

    Police Pensions have been mentioned they pay for their pensions and depending how long they have paid in depends what they get at the end of their service, if ill or injured they may mean a lump sum and a reasonable pension but not a full one

    My wife worked for the council. She got 32 days paid holiday, and six months full sick pay that reduced to half pay for another six months. I worked in the private sector. All I got was £90 a week statuary sick pay and 20 days paid holiday. I think you will find that's quite different

    The intelligent are being oppressed so the stupid don't get offended

  • Yes I got 36 days holiday, it's time served related but they were trying to phase it out in the NHS.

    I paid 11% of my salary in superannuation in the police, these days it's about 13% and the pension isn't as good.

    Since private companies are out to make money it's probably right that salaries reflect that, whereas CS and PS are paid by the tax payer and that is reflected in their salaries.

    Public sector pensions, holidays and sick pay have generally been better, having been on the positive side of it, I can admit that it is rather generous.

    Did your parents have any children that lived.

  • My wife worked for the council. She got 32 days paid holiday, and six months full sick pay that reduced to half pay for another six months. I worked in the private sector. All I got was £90 a week statuary sick pay and 20 days paid holiday. I think you will find that's quite different work

    When I first started work back in the 60's I work in the private sector , in the 70's I started work in the Public Sector for over 30 years later I worked for a London Council for 10 years my leave if I remember correctly 28 days leave per year the longer you worked that increased, I was never off sick long enough to be be on sick pay, when I left and worked for myself I earned far more then the Council paid and easier work

    At the end of the day it boils down to the choices you make on what you want to do and earn decent pay and enjoy what you do as well that's a bonus.

  • ...Which of course is the basis for negotiation. Get rid of those advantages and add the money saved to salaries. Simples, and better comparison with the private sector salariss.

  • None of which pays the mortgage

    It will do if you're sick.

    No reason we can't pay every public worker a salary of at least £200k, but it's the tax payer who has to fund it. Don't forget, the government don't have any money, they only have our ours

    The intelligent are being oppressed so the stupid don't get offended

  • Police officers do pay a large amount into their pensions but it does not pay for the pensions. There is no pensions scheme as such. On the day they retired they can get a tax free lump sum which is far more than they ever paid in. They can then get their pension . Many spend more years on the pension than they did actually doing the job

  • Actually, to some extent your correct there is no pension fund, pensions are paid from the forces budget. That said, the superannuation deductions are a big chunk of an individuals salary.

    When I left the army, my salary as a PC was similar to my salary as a Sergeant in the army, but I had less disposable income.

    The police pension commutation tables I believe are on a par with the CS in general. When I left in 1999, I got £1500 lump sum for every £100 of pension commuted. Today I believe its about £1100.

    Life expectancy of a person who spends the majority of their working life on shifts is greatly reduced, in addition the job itself needs little in the way of explaining. Stress, violence, long days and nights, messed about diet and abused and trying to live your life without bursting other people's bubbles. Look at the comments that appear on here, so called educated people that can pass remarks that clearly show they haven't got a clue about policing or life.

    I know alot of ex cops that didn't last 10 years post job, the profession does that to people. That said, I'd still rather be a UK cop than an American one, and I certainly know how to use a gun.

    I've seen and dealt with stuff that have made people puke, both as a cop and a soldier. As such I believe, biased as that is, that every cop deserves his/her pension 10 fold.

    Did your parents have any children that lived.

  • Police officers do pay a large amount into their pensions but it does not pay for the pensions. There is no pensions scheme as such. On the day they retired they can get a tax free lump sum which is far more than they ever paid in. They can then get their pension . Many spend more years on the pension than they did actually doing the job

    On retirement Police Officers can if they wish take a lump sum up to 25% of what they have paid in during their service, the Treasury backs the Police Pension scheme as unlike other occupational pensions they cannot invest any of the money they pay in to the scheme each month.

    Basically those who are still serving and paying their pension into the pot pay the pensions of those who have retired

  • That 25% applies to anyone commuting part of their pension. But unlike private pensions a public sector pension cannot be emptied.

    Did your parents have any children that lived.

  • This then is the point, public servants are generally paid less but they tend to get a better pension was unfunded

    In effect we are currently not paying the full cost of employing public servants, the cost of the pension is deferred to a later date

  • Exactly = a Phd opens doors.

    8|Do not trade me a Rabbit and hand me a Hare. (I know the strain of species in Leporidae).

    Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it.

  • These are mere words pushed to the fore by our crass MSM. The EU has no power whatsoever. The ECHR can be applied to a process further down the track. (Employment Law)

    8|Do not trade me a Rabbit and hand me a Hare. (I know the strain of species in Leporidae).

    Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it.

  • These are mere words pushed to the fore by our crass MSM. The EU has no power whatsoever. The ECHR can be applied to a process further down the track. (Employment Law)

    I wouldn’t be so sure. I think there may be a provision about workers’ rights in the Brexit deal itself whereby any watering down of those rights would give Britain an advantage over the EU. But even if that is the case, the train drivers’ dispute does not impact on UK/EU trade, so I agree they should keep out of it.

    However, there is the wider implication that this legislation could be applied to any dispute, and perhaps that is what is of concern to the EU.

    This just adds to my view that the Brexit deal was too broad and we need to ditch it as soon as we have alternative plans for trading with other countries drawn up and ready to go. Then we can give notice of withdrawal from this straightjacket agreement that the remainers forced on us through their shenanigens during the negotiations.

  • I wouldn’t be so sure. I think there may be a provision about workers’ rights in the Brexit deal itself whereby any watering down of those rights would give Britain an advantage over the EU. But even if that is the case, the train drivers’ dispute does not impact on UK/EU trade, so I agree they should keep out of it.

    However, there is the wider implication that this legislation could be applied to any dispute, and perhaps that is what is of concern to the EU.

    This just adds to my view that the Brexit deal was too broad and we need to ditch it as soon as we have alternative plans for trading with other countries drawn up and ready to go. Then we can give notice of withdrawal from this straightjacket agreement that the remainers forced on us through their shenanigens during the negotiation

    I agree. Perhaps Cameron was installed to get a grip on the direction of travel.

    8|Do not trade me a Rabbit and hand me a Hare. (I know the strain of species in Leporidae).

    Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it.

  • I wouldn’t be so sure. I think there may be a provision about workers’ rights in the Brexit deal itself whereby any watering down of those rights would give Britain an advantage over the EU.

    Yes.

    Remember the words "level playing field" which the EU kept touting. I think that phrase is burnt into my brain forever.

    If we leave the club, which we have done, why should there be a level playing field?

    Anyway, they won on that...X/

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