'Historic' 15-year plan to boost NHS workforce

When making a post, please ensure it complies with this site's Main Rules at all times.
  • 'Historic' 15-year plan to boost NHS workforce
    There will be a big expansion in student places and apprenticeships - but critics say action is needed now.
    www.bbc.co.uk

    Sunak has promised £2.4bn over the next five years as part of a wider plan to increase the number of doctors and nurses we have in the country. He is going to increase the amount of training places available and consult on whether medical degrees should be shortened by a year, but is he missing a trick here?

    If the State pays for a doctor to be trained, should it not be the case that that person who enjoyed the benefits of being trained by the State, should have to guarantee to work for the State aka NHS for a set amount of time?

    Why do nurses need degrees? Aren't they meant to nurse, rather than be wannabee doctors?

    Although the news about more training places is long overdue (half of all doctors and nurses are imported for overseas) shouldn't this have happened twenty years ago? And are the announced measures enough? I think they fall well short of what's needed.

  • Throwing more money at it doesn't necessarily mean that people will want to take up the profession.

    Why would they want to, when all they hear from unions etc when trying to justify industrial action is that it's a shit paid, highly stressful job working long hours 24/7 and you're as likely as not to get verbally abused if not assaulted by patients?

  • IMHO the NHS cannot keep up with the demand on it 24/7 due to the size of the population which will reach 70 million in a few years even with the huge workforce it has largest employer in Europe, the wages bill alone is enormous.

    It is not efficiently run and wastes a lot of money, people abusing the system wastes money and demoralises the staff, it has to be made more efficient just pumping more money into only papers over the cracks for a few years, it cannot continue as it is for much longer.

    Millions of pounds is paid out in compensation every year for medical mistakes

  • Throwing more money at it doesn't necessarily mean that people will want to take up the profession.

    Why would they want to, when all they hear from unions etc when trying to justify industrial action is that it's a shit paid, highly stressful job working long hours 24/7 and you're as likely as not to get verbally abused if not assaulted by patients?

    The BBC article that I linked to said that medical university places are oversubscribed and have been for ages. This is something that should've been addressed decades ago.

  • The BBC article that I linked to said that medical university places are oversubscribed and have been for ages. This is something that should've been addressed decades ago.

    Oversubcribed university places, by itself, means nothing to me.

    It tells me nothing.

    It might if those passing through university ever pursued/let alone stayed in the professions relating to the degrees they studied.

    What's the drop out rate on those courses?

    What percentage of those that complete their medical degrees take up a role within the NHS and how long do they remain working in it?

  • https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-66052274

    Sunak has promised £2.4bn over the next five years as part of a wider plan to increase the number of doctors and nurses we have in the country. He is going to increase the amount of training places available and consult on whether medical degrees should be shortened by a year, but is he missing a trick here?

    If the State pays for a doctor to be trained, should it not be the case that that person who enjoyed the benefits of being trained by the State, should have to guarantee to work for the State aka NHS for a set amount of time?

    Why do nurses need degrees? Aren't they meant to nurse, rather than be wannabee doctors?

    Although the news about more training places is long overdue (half of all doctors and nurses are imported for overseas) shouldn't this have happened twenty years ago? And are the announced measures enough? I think they fall well short of what's needed.

    Yes, I agree with all of that. Why on Earth we would pay for all that training and then let them go abroad or leave the profession amazes me. They should be made to pay it back if they leave within 10 years (reduced to reflect the number of years served after training).

    I put such a scheme in place of my last employment to combat high turnover. It worked a treat.

  • Oversubcribed university places, by itself, means nothing to me.

    It tells me nothing.

    It might if those passing through university ever pursued/let alone stayed in the professions relating to the degrees they studied.

    What's the drop out rate on those courses?

    What percentage of those that complete their medical degrees take up a role within the NHS and how long do they remain working in it?

    At present it is up to the individual what profession they want to work in , they are free to leave at anytime they like, people who are in University now can drop out any time they like or switch course, but they end up with a hefty bill at the end , most have to take up part time work to pay for their digs etc .

    This new proposal with the NHS is the right way to go IMO only those who really want to work in medicine will accept the conditions

Participate now!

Don’t have an account yet? Register yourself now and be a part of our community!