Assisted Dying In the UK should it be Legal ?

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  • Work and Pensions Secretary Mel Stride has signalled his support for another parliamentary vote on assisted dying.

    He said there was no fresh legislation in the works, but he "would not be averse" to a new Commons debate.

    A bill to legalise assisted dying in the UK was defeated in 2015. Another Tory MP, Alicia Kearns, said national discourse has changed since then.

    The issue is being discussed after Esther Rantzen announced she had joined the Dignitas assisted dying clinic.

    Dame Esther, 83, has stage-four lung cancer and told BBC Radio 4's The Today Podcast on Monday that she planned to "buzz off to Zurich", where the practice is legal, if her treatment did not work.

    Assisted suicide is banned in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, with a maximum prison sentence of 14 years. While there is no specific offence of assisted suicide in Scotland, euthanasia is illegal and can be prosecuted as murder or manslaughter.

    What do you think ?

    I think that if a person is so ill and still able to make a rational informed decision that they cannot carry on and have no wish to keep on living or suffer any more pain , it should be legal here provided they are still of sound mind to make the decision themselves and Medical Experts agree they are able to make such a serious decision

  • I think this is always going to create strong arguments for and against. Those against always seek to protect the vulnerable from coercion into agreeing to end their lives but in so doing they condemn many many more to live out the most terrible deaths, especially in the case of various cancers that can take years to finish you.

    I think there is a case now for defining conditions to be met that would allow for assisted dying to become legal in the UK. To rule it out for everyone simply to protect vulnerable people is no longer a suitable blanket answer. We must establish a framework for identifying those that can be given this option and those that we still need to protect.

    Celebrate it, Anticipate it, Yesterday's faded, Nothing can change it, Life's what you make it

  • I agree 100% , the vulnerable must be protected and not manipulated by others, hence Medical Experts in all cases should undertake a full assessment that the person is able to make such a decision themselves

  • I'm for assisted dying with strong and unequivocal safeguards.----- It is cruel to deny someone, who is in extreme terminal pain the right to end their life with dignity.

    The Voice of Reason

  • who is in extreme terminal pain the right to end their life with dignity

    This is where pain control via drugs, Morphine, Fentanyl etc comes into play with palliative care. Specialist pain control teams are basically legally euthanising someone slowly by upping the dose. There comes a point where the drug represses breathing (Respiratory Depression) to the point of death in other words an overdose. It's then hard to argue over then whether it's the drug or the disease that has killed someone because as the disease advances so does the pain therefore drug dosage increases.

    The difference between this and what Dignitas do is that Dignitas gives you one big hit in one go and gets it over and done with quicker. If your at the point in life where your considering Dignitas then you may as well go and get some Heroin (street morphine) off the streets. It would be cheaper and do the same thing if a big enough dose to what your body is used to. Saying that one may prefer the comfort of a bed and having their family around them to say goodbye too first and or say a last prayer etc along with feeling more comfortable physically and morally due to their surroundings along with the caring and supportive nature of the staff. Saying that one coud do the same at home with family around them but then that would make your family or whoever is at your side a criminal with assisted dying.

  • I think this is always going to create strong arguments for and against. Those against always seek to protect the vulnerable from coercion into agreeing to end their lives but in so doing they condemn many many more to live out the most terrible deaths, especially in the case of various cancers that can take years to finish you.

    I think there is a case now for defining conditions to be met that would allow for assisted dying to become legal in the UK. To rule it out for everyone simply to protect vulnerable people is no longer a suitable blanket answer. We must establish a framework for identifying those that can be given this option and those that we still need to protect.

    Seconded

    The staff here send me bizarre messages I'm barred from replying to and now I'm blocked from starting new conversations. icon_rolleyes.gif

    This place could have been good but 'could' is so last tense. I'll be back, maybe but no one hold their breath.

  • This is one version of it :

    main-qimg-5686afd7915267f162abcacc0fb106ad

    8| "If there be time to expose through discussion, the falsehoods and fallacies, to avert the evil by the processes of education, the remedy to be applied is more speech, not enforced silence"

    IF YOU STAND FOR NOTHING - YOU FALL FOR EVERYTHING.

  • That's what they did with King George V

    The staff here send me bizarre messages I'm barred from replying to and now I'm blocked from starting new conversations. icon_rolleyes.gif

    This place could have been good but 'could' is so last tense. I'll be back, maybe but no one hold their breath.

  • The official version was that he died peacefully in his sleep

    An overdose of morphine will put anyone to sleep. Anyway his doctor admitted it

    The staff here send me bizarre messages I'm barred from replying to and now I'm blocked from starting new conversations. icon_rolleyes.gif

    This place could have been good but 'could' is so last tense. I'll be back, maybe but no one hold their breath.

  • An overdose of morphine will put anyone to sleep. Anyway his doctor admitted it

    https://www.nytimes.com/1986/11/28/wor…-v-s-death.html

    Ah Ha - I was getting confused with George VI (Queen Elizabeth II late father died 1952) - he was riddled with lung cancer and apparently died in his sleep but given the medical trends of the time it would not be surprising if he got the same treatment.

    Celebrate it, Anticipate it, Yesterday's faded, Nothing can change it, Life's what you make it

  • Apparently he didn't say 'Bugger Bognor' as his last words either but I so wish it was true.

    The staff here send me bizarre messages I'm barred from replying to and now I'm blocked from starting new conversations. icon_rolleyes.gif

    This place could have been good but 'could' is so last tense. I'll be back, maybe but no one hold their breath.

  • if you go to Cuzco in Peru many of the hotels there will actually give you a bag of Cocaine loaded sweets (to help deal with the altitude). I left them untouched. Stupid I ain't.

    The staff here send me bizarre messages I'm barred from replying to and now I'm blocked from starting new conversations. icon_rolleyes.gif

    This place could have been good but 'could' is so last tense. I'll be back, maybe but no one hold their breath.

  • if you go to Cuzco in Peru many of the hotels there will actually give you a bag of Cocaine loaded sweets (to help deal with the altitude). I left them untouched. Stupid I ain't.

    I guffawed when I saw that, then realised that you said ‘altitude’ and not ‘attitude’!

  • "not ‘attitude’!"

    He should have taken the cocaine.

    8| "If there be time to expose through discussion, the falsehoods and fallacies, to avert the evil by the processes of education, the remedy to be applied is more speech, not enforced silence"

    IF YOU STAND FOR NOTHING - YOU FALL FOR EVERYTHING.

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