Horizon's Gardening Topic

  • And I replied on the other forum and said this:


    In my area now.... most people tend to hate all things green... Trees in particular... Have a look at the police thread for a clue about this!


    Just looking out my window and my hellebores are starting to come out.

  • And then LW replied by saying:


    The tree fellers are everywhere! We have a number of big trees in our garden. I also have three lemon trees and an apple tree grown from seed. All big now. We have a Canary Island Date Palm, three Stinkwoods, four acacia caffras, a huge monkey thorn tree, a black Karee and a large Silver Oak. And various smaller jobs like bottle brushes and fancy conifers and some privets.

  • And I then said on the old forum:


    ... sounds lovely. You can't live in London with a garden that big!


    We do have tree fellers here employed by the council. But I was more thinking of my neighbours and people who have moved in over the last 20 years...


    People in my area always used to be the same and took great pride in themselves and their neighbourhood. That's all changed and people like my neighbour find things like trees offensive (I'm not kidding) with the result my area doesn't have many now.

  • And then Heero Yuy replied on the old forum by saying:


    Too many front gardens round here have been sacrificed to the car god. I'm not really a keen gardener so it tends to be a once in while major cut back and clear up. Our back garden though is quite small and done as a sunken patio surrounded by raised beds and I do get annuals to go in them. In terms of static plants at the back I have a rather large Canary Island Palm, a cornish palm that has had to regrow from the root due to a fungal infection of the main stem, a jelly palm (Butea Capitata) and a Japanese banana palm that I try to protect from the winter frosts with fleece. Don't always succed so it sometimes has to re-grow from the root.

  • And LW then replied:


    Our trees have changed our garden completely. When we first moved in over 20 years ago it was a wasteland. We grew a lawn, made flower beds and planted trees. Over the years the trees have grown tall and shaded most of the original plants out. Now we have to replant stuff that will go under these big trees. The grass has also largely said goodbye so we are going to pave where the trees have shaded it out and let it grow where it is happy. Quite a lot of work ahead but the shade the trees offer in summer is worth it.

  • And finally I said on the older forum this:


    Sounds nice, would love to have a banana plant but I'm not sure if I'm brave enough to try and grow one and try and overwinter it.


    In my area, the front gardens have all been sacrificed for car parking too (not mine!) but what I was saying the other day, is, that it's the attitude in general to all things green by my lovely neighbours which is the real problem. They hate green, trees, birds, anything natural and I'm in the minority now.

  • And finally I said on the older forum this:


    Sounds nice, would love to have a banana plant but I'm not sure if I'm brave enough to try and grow one and try and overwinter it.


    In my area, the front gardens have all been sacrificed for car parking too (not mine!) but what I was saying the other day, is, that it's the attitude in general to all things green by my lovely neighbours which is the real problem. They hate green, trees, birds, anything natural and I'm in the minority now.


    Here's a picture I took last year, the jelly palm is in the foreground. Unfortuantely the wind last spring had shreaded some of the older fronds. A smaller "pup" is in front of the garage window.

    History is much like an Endless Waltz. The three beats of war, peace and revolution continue on forever.

    4312-gwban-gif

  • Nice! Looks like Autumn, but I suspect your Autumn might not be "quite" the same as mine.


    It's a rather bad photo of a few years' ago Autumn. Our autumn is similar to yours in that trees go yellow and gold and it gets chilly. But in my region this is when the storms and rain leave and blue sky turns up until the following spring, with maybe a few showers, if we're lucky, during winter. Winter is cold and frosty but the sunshine in the day helps. Nights are freezing. Everything goes brown. Garden becomes still, windless, peaceful place with basking birds and crystal clear air (when the city pollution isn't around, weekends are best). The stars at night are superb, like millions of glittering crystals.


    A decayed cyclone from Mozambique has just passed us by to the north and we are getting rain. It's raining as I write this. Fantastic! The El Nino drought has broken. I love rain. Especially the soft, steady kind. We mostly get wildly electric summer storms where I am, but when something comes this way from Mozambique, we get beautiful rain and it's never laden with industrial stink, so it's pure and gorgeous. The trees and flowers are celebrating. The parrot is burbling in his aviary. He seems to like rain as well. He originates in the Congo and Tanzania and lives in his own aviary in the garden, just outside my study window actually. He can see me writing so he is talking and humming and making all the sounds he knows (he has a very large vocabulary.) His name is Louis.

  • I don't know anything about palms, but I'm pretty sure Monty (BBC Gardeners' World) said to cut them down quite harshly and wrap them in straw or paper, then seal and cover with fleece to protect them from Winter frost and winds. But that may be wrong, so don't touch them without researching it first.


    My most exotic shrub is a Fatsia which I love. It is in a sheltered spot by my house and its rock solid. No disease, no winter damage, no problems, ever. (touch wood)

  • Heero, I'm amazed you can grow a banana plant in England.


    We live on the south coast of the UK about 2 miles from the sea, almost at sea level and we have downland behind to the North. Tends to help keep the Winter frosts from being too harsh. The plant is also in a sun-trap formed by the terrace running North-South that you can see the end of, the garage and our house which is in another terrace running East-West


    The banana is also the hardiest of it's type ( Musa Basjoo) At the moment it's all swaddled in horticultural fleece but is still green inside. Several times I have had it get cut down to the root by frost when I didn't get the fleece on earlier enough and it then has to regrow. Been lucky the last three or four Winters so it's getting quite sturdy now and less frost prone.

    History is much like an Endless Waltz. The three beats of war, peace and revolution continue on forever.

    4312-gwban-gif

  • Heero, I'm amazed you can grow a banana plant in England.


    Is that the taller shrub? I'm almost 100% that in Britain, banana plants should be cut down heavily for winter protection and use the method, I described.


    I've been out in my garden today. Lovely warm weather here in London and sun too!


    (Edit: I typed the post after your already said what the plant is and you give it winter protection)

  • It's a rather bad photo of a few years' ago Autumn. Our autumn is similar to yours in that trees go yellow and gold and it gets chilly. But in my region this is when the storms and rain leave and blue sky turns up until the following spring, with maybe a few showers, if we're lucky, during winter. Winter is cold and frosty but the sunshine in the day helps. Nights are freezing. Everything goes brown. Garden becomes still, windless, peaceful place with basking birds and crystal clear air (when the city pollution isn't around, weekends are best). The stars at night are superb, like millions of glittering crystals.


    A decayed cyclone from Mozambique has just passed us by to the north and we are getting rain. It's raining as I write this. Fantastic! The El Nino drought has broken. I love rain. Especially the soft, steady kind. We mostly get wildly electric summer storms where I am, but when something comes this way from Mozambique, we get beautiful rain and it's never laden with industrial stink, so it's pure and gorgeous. The trees and flowers are celebrating. The parrot is burbling in his aviary. He seems to like rain as well. He originates in the Congo and Tanzania and lives in his own aviary in the garden, just outside my study window actually. He can see me writing so he is talking and humming and making all the sounds he knows (he has a very large vocabulary.) His name is Louis.


    We've had a bit of frost here in London, but overall (touch wood, it ain't over yet!) the weather has been quite mild. It's about 15 degrees c here and sunny today and my plants are starting to wake up.... I hope frost doesn't come. We can still get it here right up until mid April, although overall the weather is far warmer here than most parts of the UK.

  • Is that the taller shrub? I'm almost 100% that in Britain, banana plants should be cut down heavily for winter protection and use the method, I described.


    Quite right, I cut the fronds down to about 6" once they get nipped by the first frost and use the stubs to hold the fleece away from the heart of the crown. I wrap the trunk and than also put bean poles round the trunk about a foot away and put a second shield of fleece held on with pegs.


    Quote

    I've been out in my garden today. Lovely warm weather here in London and sun too!


    Sunny down here, 13°C and quite springlike.

    History is much like an Endless Waltz. The three beats of war, peace and revolution continue on forever.

    4312-gwban-gif

  • I've got more spring bulbs starting to appear....as you say, the cold is returning.


    LW, what are the times for your seasons where you are? And do they last for the same time as the UK ie 3 months per season, or is it different for you?


    I can never get round my head that while Britain freezes, Aussies have barbecues at Christmas on the beach.

  • We have a very short cold period, about three months. Climates differ quite lot as SA is a big country and some have rainy, cold winters with wind, some inland places with mountains have snow and others have freezing frosty jobs with sun and a host in between. It can get extremely cold in some places.


    But as a rule, autumn starts about late March but it can still be very warm, it's just that some trees get the message from the change in the declination of the sun and they begin to turn golden if they are deciduous. I have a tree in the garden with a few yellow leaves already.


    Autumn goes on till about late April/early May when it's perfect temperature wise. It's like a wonderful gap between hot and cold. Then comes winter and late May, June and July can be really cold, but as mid August breaks the trees start sprouting and the birds start thinking about nesting again. A few cold snaps can be experienced well into September. September 1st is our version of your May Day. By October it is boiling hot. This goes on until end of February. Mostly where I am it's warm and only in June and July is it really cold.


    Other places are much different. Summer temperatures where I am start at about 23 degrees C and go up to anything like 36-37 in summer.


    We grew our garden trees over 20 years ago when we moved to our present house because we wanted shade and now that the trees are all tall and spreading, they keep the house cooler. They also keep the glare off.


    Here is a pic of our acacia caffras in full bloom in spring.



  • 23 degrees is just the perfect temperature for me, anything above that and I feel uncountable. Very interesting post LW, thanks!


    Like your tree too! My neighbour grew a tree from seed and I think it was an African tree, it was over 40 years old. I'll have to dig up a picture. But my new neighbours who came in destroyed it... I say new, I've had them for over 10 years now...

  • Yep! More to say on that in that thread in the future..it's all part of the key reason(s) why I created this site.


    BTW, re your earlier post about the stars. I have never seen in my entire lifetime a sky filled with stars.... As well as sci-fi, I love the real stuff too, even got a telescope a few years ago. But from my location at best, you can see perhaps a few dozen stars and that's it.

  • That's the trouble with big cities. When were more central the sky just looked pale orange at night. We are about 25 kms from the very bright lights now and we see more stars. Have a specially big beauty, must be Venus? just outside the door and in winter it is like a flashing greenish crystal. I love it so much I put it in one of my books :D.


    There is a retirement complex that backs onto our suburban nature reserve and one of the guys living there has a small observatory he built for himself. One can see the little dome of this when one walks in the reserve.

  • If it's a big bright "star", yep Venus or Jupiter most likely. Saturn tends to be dimmer and Mars much smaller and less bright and red of course.


    Correction, obviously if it is flashing, that is a star. It's the easiest way to tell the difference between a star and a planet. It must be the Dog Star, Sirius. I think it has a greenish tinge to it. Next time I see it, I'll have a closer look.


  • I have consistently noticed a greenish colour to this star. It's very large and bright when it's close. I have seen the reddish smaller one so that must be Mars.


    I love the cosmos and have been attracted to the stars since I was old enough to see them. I once used to get an Astronomy magazine, but the subscribers and the mag itself were so taken up with their telescopes and the technical details of these that my love of the stars just wasn't catered for. I am at a loss when it comes to the mathematical calculations they make and the maps they draw up, etc. I just wanted information on what they could see through their telescopes and on the planets and stars themselves. So I stopped getting the magazine and returned to the sky itself.


    In the desert and semi-desert regions of SA the sky is so clear that the stars seem to be close enough to reach up and touch. My first experience of this was to be stunned into silence at this display. An inky backdrop filled with jewels. It was just amazing. They seemed so close. It was silent and dark and there they were, glittering in their zillions. Definitely worth looking at in one of these clear air regions with no artificial lights messing up the darkness of the sky. Ever afterwards, you know the stars are just there, even if you can't see most of them anymore.

  • I think there's only two or three areas of the UK which have a clear view of the night sky, so it's definitely a life aim to go to one of these places and see the "proper" sky.


    I guess I should create a new Cosmos topic, but I don't want to dominate the board by creating all the subjects. Been at The Times online all morning, "pimping" for business.:cool: Got a new member last night as a result.

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