The Great NHS debate

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  • It's not the free at the point of delivery that is the problem, it's the bolt ons. A very heavy detailed discussion needs to take place to ascertain what the nhs is prepared to ir financially capable of providing without stretching funding and services in a way which is detrimental to the whole.

    Breast augmentation, sex change, vasectomy, hair transplants, any plastic surgery unless as a result of trauma repair and I am sure others can add to that. The problem will come when the Liberals try to claim that breast augmentation is necessary for MH reasons and so on.

    Clearly the more you ask the service to do the more it's gonna cost and its always those than can afford to pay that shout the loudest that something should be included. Maybe, overall tax could be reduced and a separate levi for healthcare introduced, that way as the costs increase so it can be increased separately and any revenue raised going straight to the nhs and not into central coffers. That way funding is transparent and it will ultimately ensure we can argue properly for value for money.

    I have always believed people should be able to opt out of the NHS and be given some sort of financial incentive to do so. The NHS is just too big, and unless major changes are made it won't get better

    The intelligent are being oppressed so the stupid don't get offended

  • I have always believed people should be able to opt out of the NHS and be given some sort of financial incentive to do so.

    Bit of a slippery slope that one I reckon. If individuals start being offered opt outs for things that the taxpayer funds, where does it end?

  • It would be better if everyone paid in to the NHS as now, but a discount would be available for those seeking private treatment instead. That would really help in reducing our NHS waiting lists.

  • It would be better if everyone paid in to the NHS as now, but a discount would be available for those seeking private treatment instead. That would really help in reducing our NHS waiting lists.

    Why would it? Surely all that would do is encourage more NHS doctors to cash in by doing more and more procedures in the private sector.

  • NHS Consultant Surgeons have been working in Private Hospitals in their spare time for many years , some of them that have retired from the NHS still work in Private Hospitals on a part time basis

  • NHS Consultant Surgeons have been working in Private Hospitals in their spare time for many years , some of them that have retired from the NHS still work in Private Hospitals on a part time basis

    Which simply reinforces my point. The more you incentivize people to go the private route the more NHS doctors might review their personal work/life balance and opt to jump ship. I reckon a tax-cut/incentive to patients to go private in a bid to reduce the NHS waiting list could actually have the opposite effect.

  • It's not the free at the point of delivery that is the problem, it's the bolt ons. A very heavy detailed discussion needs to take place to ascertain what the nhs is prepared to ir financially capable of providing without stretching funding and services in a way which is detrimental to the whole.

    Breast augmentation, sex change, vasectomy, hair transplants, any plastic surgery unless as a result of trauma repair and I am sure others can add to that. The problem will come when the Liberals try to claim that breast augmentation is necessary for MH reasons and so on.

    My daughter is considering plastic surgery. She has ridiculously big boobs and they've increasingly been giving her back trouble ever since she was about 16 years of age. To have them reduced privately would cost her a little over £10k, which is £10k more than she can afford to spend on what many would describe as "cosmetic surgery."

    Back pain aside, she also suffers from the odd bout of depression, which isn't helped by being constantly hit on by drunk 50 year old men when they see the size of her breasts when she's out with friends.

    Bottom line is - it's not as clear cut as you might think to categorize what should and shouldn't be considered a "health issue."

  • Rusty Old Goat

    Surgeons no matter which type of hospital they work in can only do so many hours work every week, some surgery can take hours to complete or the problem once they go in is larger than at first thought.

    They are contracted to do so many hours per with the NHS , what they do in their spare time is their decision, NHS Surgeons may be in one NHS Hospital in the morning and in another in the afternoon.

    As I have stated before the NHS has been sending NHS patients to private hospitals for years to try and cut down NHS waiting lists, however the problem the NHS faces is the amount of patients it has to deal with week in week out due to the size of the population, we are living longer.

    Another serious problem is Obesity as the NHS call it a ticking time bomb due to the health problems that obese people develop over the years.

    Private Medical Insurance is now cheaper than ever, I avoid the NHS if I can and go Private , the more people that can do that the better it takes some weight off the NHS

  • My daughter is considering plastic surgery. She has ridiculously big boobs and they've increasingly been giving her back trouble ever since she was about 16 years of age. To have them reduced privately would cost her a little over £10k, which is £10k more than she can afford to spend on what many would describe as "cosmetic surgery."

    Back pain aside, she also suffers from the odd bout of depression, which isn't helped by being constantly hit on by drunk 50 year old men when they see the size of her breasts when she's out with friends.

    Bottom line is - it's not as clear cut as you might think to categorize what should and shouldn't be considered a "health issue."

    According to this ( hope the link works) your daughter may be eligible for a Breast Reduction on the NHS,

    Breast reduction on the NHS
    Find out whether you might be eligible for breast reduction surgery on the NHS and what to do if you think you might qualify.
    www.nhs.uk
  • Another serious problem is Obesity as the NHS call it a ticking time bomb due to the health problems that obese people develop over the years.

    Private Medical Insurance is now cheaper than ever, I avoid the NHS if I can and go Private , the more people that can do that the better it takes some weight off the NHS

    Terrible pun :) :)

  • Why would it? Surely all that would do is encourage more NHS doctors to cash in by doing more and more procedures in the private sector.

    Because private hospitals employ their own medical staff as well, and they have the capacity to take on more patients.

    This doesn’t have to interfere with the minimum contract hours required of private doctors contracted to the NHS.

  • My daughter is considering plastic surgery. She has ridiculously big boobs and they've increasingly been giving her back trouble ever since she was about 16 years of age. To have them reduced privately would cost her a little over £10k, which is £10k more than she can afford to spend on what many would describe as "cosmetic surgery."

    Back pain aside, she also suffers from the odd bout of depression, which isn't helped by being constantly hit on by drunk 50 year old men when they see the size of her breasts when she's out with friends.

    Bottom line is - it's not as clear cut as you might think to categorize what should and shouldn't be considered a "health issue."

    If it gives her back pain, then surely that would not be described as unnecessary cosmetic surgery.

  • My daughter is considering plastic surgery. She has ridiculously big boobs and they've increasingly been giving her back trouble ever since she was about 16 years of age. To have them reduced privately would cost her a little over £10k, which is £10k more than she can afford to spend on what many would describe as "cosmetic surgery."

    Back pain aside, she also suffers from the odd bout of depression, which isn't helped by being constantly hit on by drunk 50 year old men when they see the size of her breasts when she's out with friends.

    Bottom line is - it's not as clear cut as you might think to categorize what should and shouldn't be considered a "health issue."

    To be fair mate, breast augmentation is the enlargement, your daughters case is different and isnt classed as a form of cosmetic surgery. The strain extra large breasts can put on the back is in itself worthy of the reduction surgery.

    I once had to help evict a female student from student accommodation, because she spent her student loan of breast enlargement.

    There is a clear point in that if a specialist deems durgery necessary then one should listen. CCG's are a pain, but they undoubtedly serve a purpose. I have spibal epidurals, the CCG got itself involved and reduced there frequency, frequency dictated previously by a pain management consultant. Now i find myself in a pigs ear of a procedure, i can have 2 injections in a 12 month period then get discharged. After aboutv2 months I ask my GP to re-refer me and the process starts again. If timings get thrown out it can be 8 to 10 months before my next one. We asked for dispensation at the beginning explaining that they kept me working, they said they wouldn't make dispensation for someone who was working. The truth is their budget is not part of the dwp budget so they weren't interested.

    I hope she gets the reduction, I know a couple of women for whom that surgery was life changing.

    Did your parents have any children that lived.

  • Because of the health problems physically and mentally as a consequence of carrying extra weight of no fault of hers then there is no question that the NHS should do this. This is not for cosmetic reasons but for health reasons

  • NHS bureaucracy has DOUBLED since start of Covid
    Analysis by the Policy Exchange thinktank showed there were 14,515 officials working in NHS England the Department of Health in February - up from 7,883 in…
    www.dailymail.co.uk

    I think there should be a sustained media campaign to urge or embarrass the government to review the number of managers and administrators of all kinds in the NHS, including all those ‘specialists’ and trainers who promote woke policies within the service that have no relevance to medicine.

    The NHS is over managed and administered, but you wouldn’t think it if you read the reports of denial coming out of the NHS and associated establishment bodies.

    This craziness must stop if we are ever to get the NHS back on its feet and get back to putting patients who need medical care first.

  • https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article…-stagnated.html

    I think there should be a sustained media campaign to urge or embarrass the government to review the number of managers and administrators of all kinds in the NHS, including all those ‘specialists’ and trainers who promote woke policies within the service that have no relevance to medicine.

    The NHS is over managed and administered, but you wouldn’t think it if you read the reports of denial coming out of the NHS and associated establishment bodies.

    This craziness must stop if we are ever to get the NHS back on its feet and get back to putting patients who need medical care first.

    Have you just blamed the government fo something?

  • I’m blaming successive governments for bureaucracy taking hold in the NHS.

    And yes, I would have expected our Conservative government, with the majority it has, to have done something by now. With a swish of the pen and with little opposition, it could have set up a Royal Commission if nothing else.

  • I’m blaming successive governments for bureaucracy taking hold in the NHS.

    And yes, I would have expected our Conservative government, with the majority it has, to have done something by now. With a swish of the pen and with little opposition, it could have set up a Royal Commission if nothing else.

    Equalities Act 2010. That is when everything really started to go pear shaped. Before that we were just about bumbling along but that single piece of legislation was like pouring oil on a playground slide. The Tories could reverse this like anything else that Labour did but they haven’t.

    Celebrate it, Anticipate it, Yesterday's faded, Nothing can change it, Life's what you make it

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