Bank staff trained to spot cash scams as they take place

  • All bank staff are to be trained to spot signs that a customer may be withdrawing cash to give to a scammer.


    Police hope the scheme will help reduce financial crime by spotting scams before money has been handed over.


    The plan is to train every single front-facing employee of banks, building societies and Post Offices.


    Cash payments to fraudsters are typically much harder to trace than online payments with the vast majority of cases going unsolved.


    Typical frauds of this kind include paying rogue builders, romance scams and elderly abuse.


    Staff at one bank which has trialled the scheme helped stop a customer being swindled out of £13,000.


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-39166130


    About time too. Stories of these b----------s conning old people out of their life savings are all too frequent. Why staff should need training though I do not know. It's obvious that if an old person is withdrawing thousands in cash, especially more than once in a short period of time, there is something amiss somewhere. I know bank staff can't refuse to give people their own money but a " Certainly Mrs. Doddery. Come and wait in the office and we'll get your money for you. " and a few discreet questions could save the victim a fortune and lead to the arrest of the scammer as in the link.


    This should have been done years ago.

  • There is also the point that an elderly person may not be just being coerced into getting their money out, they may be ill too.


    Several years ago when my dad was in the middle-ish stages of dementia, he would go to the shops and offer the shopkeepers "wad fulls" of cash. In the end, I accompanied him on every trip, but there were some interesting "issues" prior to that.


    So, whether banks or shops, any strange behaviour should be challenged and really training should not be necessary. And besides, how can you train someone in common sense?

  • There is also the point that an elderly person may not be just being coerced into getting their money out, they may be ill too.


    Several years ago when my dad was in the middle-ish stages of dementia, he would go to the shops and offer the shopkeepers "wad fulls" of cash. In the end, I accompanied him on every trip, but there were some interesting "issues" prior to that.


    So, whether banks or shops, any strange behaviour should be challenged and really training should not be necessary. And besides, how can you train someone in common sense?


    Ah! You've hit the nail on the head - there is one of the major problems of society today, common sense has been replaced by 'procedures.' 'Procedures' must be followed in every case and at all times otherwise a major catastrophe will happen. 'Procedures' normally involve lots of form filling and the need for various certificates to say you've been on a course. This would mean for instance that a policeman can't paddle across a 4 inch deep stream to rescue a distressed child because he hasn't completed his Lifeguard Training Module 3 or there isn't a life belt handy.


    No doubt, even if a cashier had the common sense to realise something was wrong she would have had to ' follow procedures' and if there is no procedure to deal with it, nothing could be done.


    That's why when a child who social workers know has been battered and bruised for weeks dies, or some other totally avoidable disaster happens we always hear the words ' Lessons have been learned. Procedures have been changed. It can never happen again. ' It's usually because 'common sense' has been replaced by 'procedures.'

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